×
The Power to build a Community (22 Nov 2019)

Do you wish to set up a STEM club? Maybe you have an idea for a professional discussion group or maybe you want to collaborate better with the members of your Area Technician group. Then why not check out the TecHKnow GROUPS area now. We give you the power of TecHKnow in your hands to manage your personal GROUP. Check it out now by clicking on the main menu.

Question Technician survey young technician stats

2 years 8 months ago - 2 years 8 months ago #40107 by oldburywellstech
Hi All

After seeing this tweet from the ASE tech conference:

ASE stats
I was wondering if anybody else on here fits into the under 30 category?

I'm in my early twenties and have been a technician for 4 years now, 3 of which I've been a senior technician. Although there's nothing wrong with the wealth of knowledge of technicians who've been in education for years, it would seem that at my new school, all of my team struggle to take me seriously and trust that my "new fangled" ideas actually work and are sometimes better than older ones.

As a result of this I'm strongly considering leaving the profession all together, just wondering if anyone else is in the same position or has any advice

Please Log in to join the conversation.

2 years 8 months ago #40109 by D.B.Ferguson

oldburywellstech wrote: Hi All

...
I'm in my early twenties and have been a technician for 4 years now, 3 of which I've been a senior technician. Although there's nothing wrong with the wealth of knowledge of technicians who've been in education for years, it would seem that at my new school, all of my team struggle to take me seriously and trust that my "new fangled" ideas actually work and are sometimes better than older ones...


Not just a young technician. There is a trick older techs have passed on (I'm 57): try to get the teachers to think that they came up with the suggestion. ;)

Technicians: providing solutions and more.

David Ferguson B.Sc.

Please Log in to join the conversation.

2 years 8 months ago #40110 by AndyG
The comment "my team" infers the other technicians are the issue ...

I would have to confess that early twenties and being a technician for only one year before being senior would make me wonder about experience levels and I could see where issue could arise.

On the other hand, perhaps they are really good?

Personally I don't have that problem as I'm old and never have good ideas ... :P

Please Log in to join the conversation.

2 years 8 months ago #40113 by joyce
Afraid I don't fit into the young category either but I don't think it is necessarily age which is the problem, I think there is often a problem with changing things - unless you get the others on side first. As with all things it is easier if you have a discussion about a change and listen to everyone who is affected by a potential change. You need to persuade them to try something with a promise to revert if it doesn't work. Outline the problem as you see it and your solution. Work as a team not as individuals. I know it can be infuriating when an individual does something that affects present smooth running of the prep room without consultation with others who work there.

This does not mean that change should not be made; but if you identify an issue, make a case for change. This will bring others on board as they will feel that their contribution is valued, it will make them more willing to give it a go, and may also reveal other solutions.

Sometimes though you may find that there is a reason why they work the way they do which might not be obvious and may have nothing to do qith thinking that ideas are 'new fangled' :)

Please Log in to join the conversation.

2 years 8 months ago #40115 by Kasey
I agree with Joyce, get them together and mention what you want to change.

Try 'I'm thinking of doing this experiment this way, what do you think?'
Don't accept 'but we've always done it like this'
Ask them what they think, take it on board, then ask if they can think of any improvements, take these on board too. There might be a case for amalgamation of ideas.

I'm not in the young category either, but I have been senior and had to get everyone on board with new ideas.

Now I work on my own so only have to convince teachers!

Please Log in to join the conversation.

2 years 8 months ago - 2 years 8 months ago #40119 by DampSquib
I'm definitely not young and have been a technician for about twenty five years with the last 10 or so as senior. Unfortunately my hackles were beginning to rise when I read your post oldburywellstech! Perhaps your generalisation about there 'being nothing wrong with the wealth of knowledge of technicians who have been in education for years' is the wrong way of looking at it? Try thinking of it this way - the wealth of knowlege that technicians being in the job for years is a valuable resource, not just something that 'isn't wrong'. We 'oldies' have met every practical and every silibus several times over and are experts at what to do. We know every cheat to get the 'right' result and have taught the great teachers of today how to do pracs. In other words, don't assume your new ways of doing things are better, they may merely be a different solution to the same result.

I guess you probably want to stamp your mark as the senior? Natural I assume, as you probably feel a bit intimidated by the more experienced technicians in 'your team', but you got the job, so you must have that 'special something'. (Ruling out the head being your relative etc.!) So, I suggest treading carefully on your older colleagues tried and trusted ways by listening to the reasons why things are done the way they are. Joyce has made some brilliant suggestions, please consider taking them up so that the relationship between you and your colleagues becomes a happy supportive one.

Ps. I am going to have to say honestly, I would probably be quite resentful of and defensive against a technician with only one year of experience becoming a senior over me when I had several years more experience, whatever their age, especially if they tried to change the way I had done things for years without a discussion. Just saying...

Please Log in to join the conversation.

2 years 8 months ago - 2 years 8 months ago #40122 by Annie
A lot of suppositions here.
We don't know if 'team' refers to team of technicians or science team as in science faculty as a whole.
You can be a senior technician even if you're the sole technician.
Old ideas are not always the best ideas and neither are new ideas. But unless you try them out you won't know and I think that is possibly what oldburywellstech is trying to do.
But there again that's another supposition.

Whatever. Tact and diplomacy, whether young or old, is important.
And if that doesn't work crush some ice with a hammer whilst muttering naughty words(very therapeutic :whistle: )
After all you're never too old to learn (unless you're about 16 and know absolutely everything about not a lot)

Please Log in to join the conversation.

2 years 8 months ago #40123 by oldburywellstech
I'm a bit upset that my post has been misinterpreted to be honest

I did not say old methods were irrelevant, I've been using them since I started.

I've actually been a senior tech for 3 years, and I became the senior tech here because the current staff didn't want the job.

I just wanted to find out if there were any other young technicians on here or if anyone knew any, because I was curious, and I was looking for advice on how to handle difficult situations.

Thankyou for those who have given some advice, I've mostly found this to be a supportive forum the last few years, but turns out I've been made to feel exactly like the staff at my current college have. I won't bring this up again

Please Log in to join the conversation.

2 years 8 months ago #40129 by bsimmo
I honestly think the young 20 techs are not a worry.

Age isn't the problem, a better gauge would be the number over 55 or 60, i.e. the pending loss of techs.

Many techs come in at 30, 40 etc as they suddenly need a job that is pleasent on the work/life balance.
Which it is, pays poor though. It's below the poverty level pay per year normally.


Anyway, the same happens to Teachers because they are youthful go out and have social lives and have the energy still.
Enjoy it and you'll be them soon.

Oh and the oldies (I'm in the middle) will like the change when it works and is easier for them.

Strangely when I started in my 20's (just by a few weeks ;-)).
They where looking forward and would take everything on board as I brought what was missing.

The techs that have done it a way for a while so like to do it the way they have done it , but that depends on the tech. Teachers the same too.

Please Log in to join the conversation.

2 years 8 months ago - 2 years 8 months ago #40130 by bsimmo
As for senior tech..
You can come out of university and have more knowledge and intelligence (not the word, but ease at doing and understanding the science and work) than many that have been doing it for years.
And you'll be in your early 20's even with alternative work experience.

Senior means naff all, it's a title and means there is slightly more responsibility given.

Have fun we are not all resentful of the young ones.

Please Log in to join the conversation.

2 years 8 months ago #40131 by DampSquib
Thank you for explaining how you became senior tech. Quite a different to being promoted over the other technicians. I'm sorry I jumped to conclusions over that.

On here we don't necessarily know the age, sex, number of heads or planet of origin etc etc of those we 'talk' to, so no preconceptions usually come in to play. ... Just remember, don't knock oldies while I'm around, they deserve an easy life! B)

Please Log in to join the conversation.

2 years 8 months ago #40133 by Baldilocks
Reading the generic nebulosity that was the laughable "job descriptions" for Croydon, the ONLY difference between 'ordinary' and 'senior' was responsibility for other staff, ie team leader. This therefore implies nothing whatsoever about age, knowledge etc.
This means that you could have the physics bod, the biology bod, the ks3 bod etc and - the bod who does the time sheets and appraisals.
Ian

“Do not believe everything you read on the Internet.” -Abraham Lincoln

Please Log in to join the conversation.

2 years 8 months ago #40136 by AndyG
With a manager's hat on, I think the problem is the perception of ability.
Older colleagues can kick back at younger managers.
Some youngsters think they know everything and refuse to accept the wisdom of the experienced.
Occasionally (and I hope not often) "youngsters", trying to learn and do the right thing, get trodden on by the "more experienced" for no reason other than being a convenient outlet for bullying.

The first two possibilities can be addressed in a team environment with good management. The third position just shouldn't happen and as soon as it's recognised needs senior management intervention.

Please Log in to join the conversation.

2 years 8 months ago #40139 by Baldilocks

oldburywellstech wrote: ....
all of my team struggle to take me seriously and trust that my "new fangled" ideas actually work and are sometimes better than older ones.


Perhaps it would help if you told us what type of "new-fangled ideas" you are talking about. Is this new ways of organising lessons, new ways of running the workload, new ways of distributing work, new ways of carrying out existing practicals?

Some context would be useful.

Ian

“Do not believe everything you read on the Internet.” -Abraham Lincoln

Please Log in to join the conversation.

2 years 6 months ago #40208 by A Walter
Tech under 30 here. There's no chance of me staying in the profession, the pay is not high enough. I worked out to have a realistic retirement I need to dump two thirds of my entire wage into my pension.

Please Log in to join the conversation.

2 years 6 months ago #40209 by oldburywellstech
Hey fellow under 30!

I was like that at my previous job as a senior tech, on just under £15K a year - just not sustainable. I was lucky enough to find a highly paid position is a sixth form college (recruiting soon btw) and realistically I could stay here for another 50 years and retire quite happily.

Highly paid positions are rare - keep an eye out for positions at uni's

Please Log in to join the conversation.

2 years 4 months ago - 2 years 4 months ago #40367 by beaky
I started as a technician aged 21. I soon learnt that experience was everything. I came from an academic lab background (analytical chemistry based degree).

I took a post as a specialist Physics technician 11 years ago at my current school. Again I bowed to the experience of the career teaching staff (and still do in many cases).

However. We are a team. We often come up with solutions together. I have strengths and weaknesses. They have strengths and weaknesses. We are aware of these and pull together to make the most of the strengths. We have a good laugh at the weaknesses.

Teamwork and flexibility is key when it comes to teching. With 14 years of working as a technician under my belt, I'd be less than impressed with a less experienced colleague coming in and refusing to listen to experience. I would welcome working with them to tweak existing ideas and maybe devise new ones.
The following user(s) said Thank You: TecHKnow

Please Log in to join the conversation.

Moderators: DampSquibTecHKnowD.B.FergusonTheOtherSeamusBaldilocks
Powered by Kunena Forum

Latest Forum Posts

More Topics »